Hungary Painting

Hungary Painting

Painting in the first half of the century failed to break its links with Vienna and its academy. The romantic Giuseppe Borsos (1821-1883) was a pupil of the Viennese academy. With the excellent portrait painter Nicola Barabás (1810-1898) the Hungarian painters resumed their journey towards Italy. Barabás studied there for some time, Carlo Brocky (1807-1855), a lively colorist, was even more impressed, who ended his career as a painter of the English court. The landscape architect Carlo Markó 1791-1860) settled in Italy and founded a school (Appeggi, near Florence), to which members of his family belonged (Carlo jun., 1822-1891; Andrea, 1824-1895; Francesco, 1832-1874; Caterina, 1833-1865); he later maintained stylistic relations with the Florentine Macchiaioli. He lived a long time in Rome, where he died, Francesco Szoldatics (1820-1916), belonging to the “Nazzareno” group. Conversely, the Venetians Michelangelo Grigoletti (1802-70), author of large altar paintings in Esztergom, and Iacopo Marastoni (1804-1860), founder in 1846 of the first painting academy in Hungary, worked in Hungary. In the second half of the nineteenth century, after Vienna, the Munich academy influenced for a time, where they not only studied, but also taught Hungarian artists, such as Alessandro Wagner (1838-1919), Alessandro Liezen-Mayer (1839-1898), Giulio Benczur (1844-1920), who, returning to his homeland, became the official painter of portraits and large historical scenes (altar in Esztergom, and Iacopo Marastoni (1804-1860), founder in 1846 of the first painting academy in Hungary. In the second half of the nineteenth century, after Vienna, the Munich academy influenced for a time, where they not only studied, but also taught Hungarian artists, such as Alessandro Wagner (1838-1919), Alessandro Liezen-Mayer (1839-1898), Giulio Benczur (1844-1920), who, returning to his homeland, became the official painter of portraits and large historical scenes (altar in Esztergom, and Iacopo Marastoni (1804-1860), founder in 1846 of the first painting academy in Hungary. In the second half of the nineteenth century, after Vienna, the Munich academy influenced for a time, where they not only studied, but also taught Hungarian artists, such as Alessandro Wagner (1838-1919), Alessandro Liezen-Mayer (1839-1898), Giulio Benczur (1844-1920), who, returning to his homeland, became the official painter of portraits and large historical scenes (Stopping Francis II RákóczyBaptism of SStefano); he combines Venetian and Rubensian elements in his quick and lively style. Still distinguished in historical painting, and especially in the fresco, Carlo Lotz (1833-1904), late and still fresh follower of Tiepolo (ceiling of the Royal Opera of Budapest) and Bartolomeo Székely (1835-1910; frescoes of the Cathedral of Pécs). The greatest talent of Hungarian painting, Michele Munkácsy (1844.-1900) in his grandiose sacred scenes (Christ before PilateGolgotha, etc.), in his scenes of Hungarian popular life (Siralomház-Confortatorio, The hero of the village), and in its fresh landscapes, it represents the culmination of nineteenth-century Magyar painting. He worked for a long time in Paris, as did his peer, Ladislao Paál (1846-79), a very fine landscape painter, near the Barbizon school. Vittorio Madarász (1830-1917), a painter of historical scenes, also studied in Paris in the first half of the century, attracted by Delacroix. But the real flow to the French capital came towards the end of the century, in the epoch of late Impressionism.

According to Itypeusa, Carlo Ferenczy (1862-1917), Stefano Csók (1865), Giovanni Vaszary (1867), Béla Iványi-Grünwald (1867), Stefano Réthy (1872), transplanted the rules of impressionism and plein air, but they transformed them according to their temperament, with more freedom and with a coloristic fantasy close to popular taste. Most of these artists, in company with others, such as Simeone Hollóssy (1857-1918), Thorma Giovanni (1870), Oscar Glatz (1872) joined the school of Nagybánya (Baia Mare), which worked towards the 1900 emancipation of Hungarian painting from Munich. The other group, around Adolfo Fényes (1867), with similar concepts, was formed in Szolnok. The most important and most independent of the French in the movement of Hungarian painting was Paolo Szinyei Merse (1845-1920), a landscape painter full of poetry who expresses the Hungarian vision with sublime clarity (Maggiolatathe Lark). Far from the Monachese and Parisian currents, Géza Mészöly (1844-87) with his landscapes of Lake Balaton and Ladislao Mednyánsky (1852-1919), with his gloomy Carpathian villages, expressed the beauties of the Hungarian land.

Contemporary art closely follows the new European currents, giving them a recognizable local stamp, which follows the general lines of Hungarian art.

During the century. XIX the most notable representatives of the historical style architecture were Nicola Ybl (1814-1891), a fine interpreter of the Palladian forms (Royal Opera of Budapest); Federico Schulek (1841-1919; Fishermen’s Bastion in Budapest) and Emerico Steindl (1839-1902; Parliament of Budapest), evocators of Romanesque and Gothic architecture; Luigi Hauszmann, reconstructor of the Royal Palace of Buda (neo-baroque). Nineteenth-century sculpture began with the work of Steiano Ferenczy (1792-1856), who in Rome was a pupil and assistant of Thorvaldsen. True Magyar temperament in his popular and romantic figures was Nicola Izsó (1831-1875). In this period the Venetian sculptor Marco Casagrande (1840-1880) emigrated from Italy to Hungary, who left many works in Esztergom, Budapest and Eger, where he died. In the second half of the century Luigi Stróbl (1856-1926; statues of St. Stephen and the poet Giovanni Arany, in Budapest) and Giorgio Zala (1858; monument of the martyrs) were the most industrious and most appreciated sculptors, authors of many public statues national monuments in Arad, Transylvania, the Honvéd monument of 1848-49 and the millennial monument in Budapest). The greatest talent, in his powerful sculptural style, was Giovanni Fadrusz (1858-1903), who died young, author of the statue of Mattia Corvino in Kolozsvár (Cluj) and of Maria Theresa in Pozsony (Bratislava). Among the living, the nineteenth-century currents follow the classicists Giovanni Pásztov and Stefano Pásztov, the expressive Ede Felcs and the robust Francesco Sidló. Stephen and the poet Giovanni Arany, in Budapest) and Giorgio Zala (1858; monument of the national martyrs in Arad, Transylvania, monument of the Honvéd of 1848-49 and the millennial monument in Budapest). The greatest talent, in his powerful sculptural style, was Giovanni Fadrusz (1858-1903), who died young, author of the statue of Mattia Corvino in Kolozsvár (Cluj) and of Maria Theresa in Pozsony (Bratislava). Among the living, the nineteenth-century trends are followed by the classicists Giovanni Pásztov and Stefano Pásztov, the expressive Ede Felcs and the robust Francesco Sidló. Stephen and the poet Giovanni Arany, in Budapest) and Giorgio Zala (1858; monument of the national martyrs in Arad, Transylvania, monument of the Honvéd of 1848-49 and the millennial monument in Budapest). The greatest talent, in his powerful sculptural style, was Giovanni Fadrusz (1858-1903), who died young, author of the statue of Mattia Corvino in Kolozsvár (Cluj) and of Maria Theresa in Pozsony (Bratislava). Among the living, the nineteenth-century trends are followed by the classicists Giovanni Pásztov and Stefano Pásztov, the expressive Ede Felcs and the robust Francesco Sidló. author of the statue of Mattia Corvino in Kolozsvár (Cluj) and of Maria Teresa in Pozsony (Bratislava). Among the living, the nineteenth-century trends are followed by the classicists Giovanni Pásztov and Stefano Pásztov, the expressive Ede Felcs and the robust Francesco Sidló. author of the statue of Mattia Corvino in Kolozsvár (Cluj) and of Maria Teresa in Pozsony (Bratislava). Among the living, the nineteenth-century trends are followed by the classicists Giovanni Pásztov and Stefano Pásztov, the expressive Ede Felcs and the robust Francesco Sidló.

Hungary Painting

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