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Tag: Hungary

Hungary Sculpture

Hungary Sculpture

In sculpture, the new realism soon emerged with the work of the brothers Giorgio and Martino di Kolozsvár (equestrian statue of St. George in Prague, bronze of 1373). Their art came out of Hungarian goldsmith’s art, rich and original in motifs and techniques. The ancient Hungarian goldsmiths had many contacts with the Italian one, as a consequence of the fact that many Hungarian goldsmiths worked, especially in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, in Italy (Giovanni delle Bombarde and Giovanni di…

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Hungary Painting

Hungary Painting

Painting in the first half of the century failed to break its links with Vienna and its academy. The romantic Giuseppe Borsos (1821-1883) was a pupil of the Viennese academy. With the excellent portrait painter Nicola Barabás (1810-1898) the Hungarian painters resumed their journey towards Italy. Barabás studied there for some time, Carlo Brocky (1807-1855), a lively colorist, was even more impressed, who ended his career as a painter of the English court. The landscape architect Carlo Markó 1791-1860) settled…

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Hungary Music

Hungary Music

Since the first decade of the twentieth century, B. Bartók (1881-1945) and Z. Kodály (1882-1967), the two greatest representatives of Hungarian music of the 20th century, had laid the foundations for the creation of a national school, to which most of the composers of the following generations then referred. To their own generation belongs E. Dohnányi (1887-1960), author above all of piano and chamber music, almost completely foreign to the national school, although he later devoted much of his activity…

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Hungary Location and Relief

Hungary Location and Relief

According to itypejob, Hungary is now the 17th state in Europe by surface area (93,073 sq km) (of which it is just the hundredth part) and the 11th by population (8.7 million residents). It occupies the greatest part of the Pannonian Lowlands, extends for a short distance over the Carpathian hills and includes in its territory the last buttresses of the Alpine system. Following the compromise of 1867 (see below: History), Hungary was an almost independent state before the World…

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Hungary Literature in the 1970’s and 1980’s

Hungary Literature in the 1970’s and 1980’s

In the seventies and eighties the Hungarian fiction has undergone important changes, the main meaning of which was formulated by P. Esterházy: “art wants to be above all free” (in Jelenkor, “The present age”, 1981, p. 3). With the prospects of the Sixties collapsed and faith in the possibility of changing the outside world fading, writers take refuge in the individual world. Despite the resurgence of the linguistic turn (“rather than the nation and the people, writers must worry about the subject and…

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Hungary Literature from the Origins to World War I

Hungary Literature from the Origins to World War I

From the origins to the 18th century According to findjobdescriptions, the first documents of literature in Hungarian, sermons, legends, sacred hymns, date back to the century. 13th and 14th. From the fifteenth century historical poems and commemorative songs prevail. At the same time, until the end of the Middle Ages, Latin literature of a religious nature also flourished (Stellarium and Pomeriumby Pelbárt Temosvári, 1435-1504) and one, also Latin, now of a humanistic character (Ianus Pannonius) especially during the reign of…

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Hungary Literature from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to the 21st Century

Hungary Literature from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to the 21st Century

From the end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire to the fall of the Berlin Wall Following the First World War, new states were formed in central Europe, within which more or less numerous Hungarian minorities came to be found: thus, from 1919 onwards, alongside the literary production of the Hungary properly speaking, that of some of these minorities must also be considered. This is the case, for example, of the Hungarian literature present in Romania (Transylvania), which boasts a centuries-old history…

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Hungary Literature After the Second World War

Hungary Literature After the Second World War

The decade that ended with the end of the Second World War is one of the most varied and fruitful periods of Hungarian literature. Parallel to the slow decline of outdated trends and styles, new faiths, aspirations and forms are emerging and affirming themselves. The conception of individualistic and collective life, bourgeois and popular literature, Europeanism and anti-Europeanism, realistic means of representation and imagination encroaching on the world of the fairy-tale and the mythical face each other. The problems of…

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Hungary History in the 20th Century

Hungary History in the 20th Century

The period from 1867 to 1914 was the time of a great economic and intellectual evolution of Hungary, an era in which the country’s agriculture reached impressive developments, which benefited from the vast outlet represented by the territory of the Habsburg monarchy, and industry. The interest of political life was limited only to relations with Austria, although the compromise was recognized by all parties, except for the one which rested on the enormous popularity of L. Kossuth, living in exile…

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Hungary Arts

Hungary Arts

From 1956 to the end of the seventies the situation of the figurative arts in the Hungary undergoes a radical transformation. The ruling Hungarian Socialist Labor Party gradually manages to exclude the visual arts and artists from the group of counterparts admitted to dialogue; in the sign of the centrality traditionally assigned by Hungarian culture of the 19th century to literature, Communist cultural policy focuses on literature and on cinematography, which strengthened very rapidly since the end of the 1960s….

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Hungary History – Towards the Communist Regime

Hungary History – Towards the Communist Regime

The replacement, after the victory over Germany, of an expansive and ideological Pan-Germanic influence that ran from west to east, with a Communist and Pan-Slavic Soviet – from north to mid-greek – did not change for the better the situation of Hungary, which has not yet found itself at the point of intersection and contrast between these two forces. After failing to escape the bullying of the first, she necessarily had to bow her head also in front of the…

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Hungary History – War, Resistance, Armistice

Hungary History – War, Resistance, Armistice

According to a2zdirectory.org, this annexation contributed to the definitive entry of Hungary into the German war, so much so that the regent Horthy on April 24, 1941 went to visit Hitler to define the position of the country within the Nazi “new order”. However, after the entry into the war against Russia (summer 1941) it was the concern of the Hungarian government to make contact with the Anglo-Americans – through Anton Ullein-Reviczky, one of the leaders of the resistance –…

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Hungary Population Density

Hungary Population Density

Density of population and settlement. – According to the 1930 census, Hungary has a population density of 93.3 residents per sq. km, far from relevant if we take into account that the region is flat and well cultivated. In the various committees the population is divided as follows: According to 800zipcodes, the highest densities are found in the territory of the recent settlement of Alföld, which, depopulated by the Turkish invasion, was then colonized. The 10 committees of it have…

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Hungary Population and Economy 1941

Hungary Population and Economy 1941

Population. – There was also no lack of population movements in this period. Thus in May-June 1994, 113.500 Magyars, coming from Bucovina, came to settle as settlers in Bačka, where they occupied 5 villages, first inhabited by Serbs; they had already lived for 180 years along the banks of the Suceava (tributary of the Siret), where they had settled after the destruction of their village, ordered by the Austrians in 1764 following a revolt. Within the new borders the alloglots…

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