North Macedonia Parliamentary Elections

North Macedonia Parliamentary Elections

Parliament dissolved on March 5th, 2014 after the DUI had not been able to agree with the IMRO on the nomination of a common candidate for the presidential elections. G. Ivanov secured the mandate for a second term as head of state in the second ballot on April 27, 2014 with 55.3%. The DUI had called for an election boycott. In the early parliamentary elections that took place on the same day, IMRO and DUI were able to increase their share of the vote, while the opposition Social Democrats suffered heavy losses. They did not recognize the result because of alleged irregularities and subsequently boycotted parliamentary work. Gruevski again formed a coalition cabinet made up of IMRO and DUI, which was sworn in on June 19, 2014.

From February 2015, the SDSM published documents on intercepted conversations of government members as evidence of election manipulation, corruption and unlawful influence on the judiciary, security authorities and the media. The publications sparked a serious domestic political crisis that worsened when on 9/10. 5. In 2015 at least 22 people were killed in clashes between special police forces and armed Albanians. Prime Minister Gruevski dismissed the director of the secret service and approved the resignation of the Minister of the Interior and the Minister of Transport on May 12, 2015. Tens of thousands demonstrated against the government on May 17, 2015 in Skopje and also called for Gruevski’s resignation. On May 18, 2015, tens of thousands responded to a government call for a counter-demonstration. Finally, on July 15, 2015, the government and the opposition agreed on an agreement to overcome the crisis through mediation by the EU. The negotiating partners decided to end the parliamentary boycott of the opposition and to set up a transitional government to prepare for parliamentary elections. In addition to these internal tensions, the rapidly increasing number of refugees who wanted to reach Austria and Germany from Greece via Macedonia via the Western Balkans became a major challenge for the stability of the country. In order to deal with the crisis, the government introduced a regulation according to which the refugees could legally travel to the Macedonian-Serbian border within 72 hours, to leave the country there. In view of the chaotic conditions in the northern and southern border areas, the government declared a state of emergency on August 20, 2015. From November 19, 2015, the authorities in Macedonia, Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia only allowed refugees from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan to pass through unhindered, and from March 9, 2016 only people with valid visas and passports. As a result, thousands of refugees were stranded on the Greek-Macedonian border. In 2016 only people with valid visas and passports. As a result, thousands of refugees were stranded on the Greek-Macedonian border. In 2016 only people with valid visas and passports. As a result, thousands of refugees were stranded on the Greek-Macedonian border.

As agreed in the agreement with the opposition in summer 2015, Prime Minister N. Gruevski resigned in mid-January 2016. The interim head of government became IMRO general secretary Emil Dimitriev on January 18, 2016(* 1979). Disputes about appropriate framework conditions for the early elections agreed in the agreement as well as protests against an amnesty regulation that was later revoked in connection with the wiretapping scandal led to the election date being postponed twice. Finally, the main political forces agreed on December 11th, 2016 through the mediation of the EU. The elections ended with a narrow victory for IMRO, which, in association with smaller parties, was able to win around 38.1% of the votes and 51 parliamentary seats. The opposition Social Democrats (SDMS) and their allies got 36.7% of the vote and 49 seats, the DUI got 7.3% of the votes and 10 seats.

According to best-medical-schools, the parliamentary election did not solve the domestic political crisis. Gruevski, burdened by public prosecution investigations in connection with the wiretapping scandal, was unable to form a new government. President G. Ivanov opposed the formation of a coalition by Social Democrats and Albanian parties under the leadership of SDMS Chairman Z. Zaev. On the grounds that the extension of the rights of the Albanian minority as agreed in the coalition program endangered national stability, he refused, Zaev to give the order to form a government. After the SDMS and Albanian parties had agreed on the election of a parliamentary speaker, the situation escalated. On April 27, 2017, IMRO supporters stormed parliament and attacked opposition members, journalists and security forces. Numerous people, including Z. Zaev, were injured. The police only brought the situation under control the following day. In response to pressure from the EU and the USA, President Ivanov Z. Zaev finally commissioned Zaev to form a government on May 17, 2017. This had previously given guarantees for the preservation of national unity and territorial integrity. By Zaev The center-left coalition formed by the SDMS, DUI and the Alliance for the Albanians was confirmed by Parliament on May 31, 2017 with a narrow government majority of 62 of the 120 MPs, and Zaev was sworn in as the new Prime Minister.

In the presidential elections on April 21, 2019, the social democrat Stevo Pendarovski (* 1963) won 42.84% of the votes, the challenger of the national conservative party VMRO-DPMNE Gordana Siljanovska-Davkova (* 1955) won 42.24% and the third candidate was Blerim Reka (* 1960) received 10.58% of the vote. In the runoff election on May 5th, 2019, Pendarovski received 52%, Siljanovska-Davkova lost with 45% of the vote. After the name dispute and the Prespa agreement, the election was considered a test of mood. Siljanovska-Davkova spoke out against the renaming of the country. Pendarovski was sworn in as President on May 12, 2019.

North Macedonia Parliamentary Elections

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